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Index to the Suttas of the Saŋyutta Nikāya
Mahā Vagga
Sacca Saŋyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Mahā Vagga

PTS: Saŋyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saŋyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

XII. Sacca Saŋyutta, V.414

PTS: The Kindred Sayings about The Truths, V.352
WP: Connected Discourses on the Truths, II.1838

I. Samādhi Vagga V.414

[1] Samādhi Suttaŋ, V.414

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to develop serenity because the serene individual knows things as they really are and this is essential for seeing the Four Truths.

PTS: Concentration, V.352
WP: Concentration, II.1838

[2] Patisallāna Suttaŋ, V.414

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to devote themselves to solitude because in solitude the individual knows things as they really are and this is essential for seeing the Four Truths.
Paţisallīņa: Retirement to one's own room.

PTS: Meditation, V.352
WP: Seclusion, II.1838

[3] Paţhama Kulaputta Suttaŋ, V.415

The Buddha states that whoever in the past, future or present leaves the household life for the homeless life, if done in the consummate way, does so with the idea of seeing as they are, and attaining deeper comprehension of the Four Truths.
Important in the phrasing of this statement is, of course, that this is the case when home-leaving is done with the highest intentions. Given that, what is being said is that this is the real goal of all well-intentioned seekers.

PTS: Clansman (a), V.352
WP: Clansmen (1), II.1839

[4] Dutiya Kulaputta Suttaŋ, V.415

The Buddha states that whoever in the past, future or present leaves the household life for the homeless life and finds understanding of things as they are, comes upon that understanding by way of deep comprehension of the Four Truths.

PTS: Clansman (b), V.353
WP: Clansmen (2), II.1839

[5] Paţhama Samaņa-Brāhmaņa Suttaŋ, V.416

The Buddha states that whatever seekers and brahmins there are, past, future, or present, who wake up to things the way they are, do so by way of deep comprehension of the Four Truths.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (a), V.353
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins, (1) II.1840

[6] Dutiya Samaņa-Brāhmaņa Suttaŋ, V.417

The Buddha states that whatever seekers and brahmins there are, past, future, or present, who declare that they have been or will be awakened to things the way they are, do so by declaring that they have done so by way of deep comprehension of the Four Truths.
Another way of saying this is that in whatever words an awakened one uses to state that he is an awakened one and whatever words he uses to state that such and such was his method of doing so it amounts to saying that he has awakened to the Four Truths and has done so by deep comprehension of the Four Truths. The corrolary of this is that it is very important to figure out the equivalance of the various ways understanding Arahantship is described and the equivalance of the various methods described for reaching Arahantship. Exercise: See if you can see the equivalance of the Four Truths and the Paticca Samuppada. (See: The Pali Line: The 10th Question: Samma Vijja)

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (b), V.353
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins, (2) II.1840

[7] Vitakkā Suttaŋ, V.417

The bhikkhus are urged to abandon thoughts of lust, deviance and harm and to train the mind to think 'this is pain', 'this is the source of pain', 'this is way to end pain,' 'this is the way to go about bringing an end to pain.'

PTS: Thoughts, V.354
WP: Thoughts, II.1841

[8] Cintā Suttaŋ, V.418

The bhikkhus are urged to abandon speculations concerning the world and the hereafter and to focus in stead on heart-felt comprehension of the thoughts: 'this is pain', 'this is the source of pain', 'this is way to end pain,' 'this is the way to go about bringing an end to pain.'
Cintā 'Heart-talk'. This is the form of thinking wherein one uses one's 'feeling' about what one is thinking about to push forward that thinking to the point of satisfaction. As long as one has the thought: 'This doesn't feel right,' one continues to reason out the issue. So it is not pure reason nor simple reflection nor just construction of ideas in words. As the Buddha points out, this is not in all cases a very reliable form of thinking. It works well in the case of the Four Truths because of the broadly edifying nature of the Four Truths relative to liberation.
Note that 'Tathāgata' here means anyone who has got the goal.

PTS: Reasoning, V.354
WP: Reflection, II.1841

[9] Viggāhika-Kathā Suttaŋ, V.419

The bhikkhus are urged to abandon acrimonious debate and in stead to train themselves to think about and speak with one another about the topics: 'this is pain', 'this is the source of pain', 'this is way to end pain,' 'this is the way to go about bringing an end to pain.'

PTS: Wordy Warfare, V.355
WP: Disputatious Talk, II.1842

[10] Tiracchāna-Kathā Suttaŋ V.419

The bhikkhus are urged to abandon various sorts of low talk and in stead to train themselves to speak with one another about the topics: 'this is pain', 'this is the source of pain', 'this is way to end pain,' 'this is the way to go about bringing an end to pain.'
Tiracchāna-Kathā. Tiracchāna: Athwort, slant-wize, horizontal primarily in reference to the mode of locomotion of animals. In reference to 'kathā' 'speech' meaning of a lower order, not aimed at the highest, worldly. Note that for the Buddhist at least this includes speculative thought about existence and non-existence. Consequently the discussion of whether or not the self exists now or after death and in what form, etc. (the discussion of self vs. no self) is Tiracchāna-Kathā, while the discussion of non-self ('this' is not my self, not mine, is just pain) is not.

PTS: Talk, V.355
WP: Pointless Talk, II.1843

II. Dhamma-Cakkapavattana Vaggo, V.420

[11] Tathāgatena Vutta Suttaŋ, V.420

The first sutta delivered by the Buddha after his awakening.
This probably belongs to the first sutta as it is a description of how awakening is to be arrived at using the Four Truths. It is certainly an essential part of understanding how the first sutta could have been so powerfully effective in converting the original five bhikkhus.

BD: A Roll'n a-tha Dhamma Wheel, Olds translation
Misc: The Formula of the Revolution of the Wheel of Experience, Bhante Punnaji, trans.
BS: Rhys Davids, Buddhist Suttas, Foundation of the Kingdom of Righteousness
PTS: Spoken by the Tathagata a, V.356
WP: Setting in Motion the Wheel of the Dhamma, II.1843
ATI: Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion Nanamoli Thera, trans
ATI: Piyadassi Thera, trans
ATI: Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans
French Translation French: La Roue de la Loi, Christian Prud'homme
French Translation German: Vom Vollendeten Gesprochenes, unknown, trans from Palikanon.com
Russian Translation Russian: The DhammaCakkappaVattana Sutta in Russian, Alekseyevich Ivakhnenko, trans. [link]
Spanish Translation Spanish: El Discurso de la Puesta En Movimiento de la Rueda de la Doctrina, Texto traducido del pali por Bhikkhu Nandisena
A Para Fijar Rodar la Rueda de Dhamma, spanish translation of mo version
Swedish Translation Swedish: Lärans Hjul sätts i rörelse, Svensk översättning Kerstin Jönhagen
All Things Pali Group: Discourse on the Setting in Motion of the Wheel of the Dhamma John Kelly, trans.

[12] Dutiya Tathāgatena Vutta Suttaŋ, V.424

The second sutta delivered by the Buddha after his awakening.
This probably belongs to the first sutta as it is a description of how awakening is to be arrived at using the Four Truths. It is certainly an essential part of understanding how the first sutta could have been so powerfully effective in converting the original five bhikkhus.

PTS: Spoken by the Tathagata (b), V.360
BD: The Second Sutta Spoken by the Tathāgata
WP: Tathāgatas, II.1847

[13] Khandha Suttaŋ, V.425

The Buddha gives a detailed definition of each of the Four Truths.
A very important sutta! The details, the meaning to be understood by the brief headings 'This is Pain' etc. are not frequently found in the suttas. This is not the most detailed to be found but is a good start. For a more detailed set of definitions see the fourth section of the Satipatthana Suttanta of the Digha Nikaya. Remember, however, that pushed to it's widest extent the Four Truths encompasses the whole of the Dhamma.
Note that the definition of the first truth as being the the five stockpiles of fuel (upādānakkhandha) is the equivalant of saying 'everything that constitutes existence is pain'.

PTS: Factors, V.361
WP: Aggregates, II.1874

[14] Āyatana Suttaŋ, V.426

The Buddha gives a detailed definition of each of the Four Truths.
The difference between this sutta and the previous one is that here the definition of Pain is the six personal or internal realms or spheres. Woodward: 'personal spheres of sense"; Bhk. Bodhi: Internal Sense Bases. That this was explicitly called 'the internal' spheres (or bases or realms) seems to call for a similar sutta using the external spheres, but that is missing. In any case the simple statement that Pain is to be understood as the six internal spheres should not be read as excluding the six external spheres. The very point of the sutta is to show the equivalence of the senses to the (upādānakkhandha); that is, everything in existence. (See on this the first several suttas of The Salayatana Samyutta, where both are called 'Pain.' The fact is that 'the world, the origin of the world, the end of the world, is to be found in this fathom-long body' (and other such statements) indicates that that which is experienced as existence is essentially all internal. Another possibility is that the 'āyatana of the eye' etc. was understood to mean both the eye and visual object, etc. When the components (eye:visual object) are used separately in SN 35 they are not accompanied by the term 'āyatana.' A third possibility is that the term 'ajjhattikāni' 'internal' was inserted later in error.

PTS: Sphere of Sense, V.362
WP: Internal Sense Bases, II.1848

[15] Paţhama Dhārana Suttaŋ V.426

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to bear in mind the Four Aristocratic Truths.
Dhāra: 'holding' > 'retaining > our 'bear in mind,'
Sati: 'mind' > 'memory,' 'recollection' 'remembrance',
Asati: 'out of mind' > 'to forget',
Vimaŋsa: 'Re-member' > to call to mind, construct in memory,
Vitakka: re-talk > think in words;
Vicara: 're-wander': to reminisce or ponder,
Citta: "center' > 'heart' > 'mind', the place of origin of thought and so also 'thought'
Cetanā, thought or thinking arising from the heart
Cintā: 'heart-talk', thinking governed (driven) by the emotions
Mana & Mano 'mind' mind as a sense organ controlling the objective functions giving rise to consciousness: the personal (identified with) objective mind,
Sannā: once-knowing, perception. The first point of consciousness of or identification of named forms.
Viñnāņa re-knowing-knowing-knowing. Conscious awareness, consciousness of consciousness, self-awareness.

PTS: Bearing in Mind (a), V.362
WP: Remembrance 1, II.1848

[16] Dutiya Dhārana Suttaŋ V.427

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to bear in mind the Four Aristocratic Truths.
A variation on the previous wherein the Buddha states that it would be impossible to reject these four truths and come up with another set of four truths and claim that they were spoken by the Buddha. These sorts of claims made by the Buddha are not infrequent and must be understood at a higher level. It is not that he is saying that some fool cannot come along and say this. What is being said is that an earnest, honest seeker, examining these four truths would need to see the truth of them before he could in good faith reject them and seeing the truth of them would not reject them let alone come up with a better way of expressing the truths therein, let alone claim that the Buddha did not say them. These truths provide the solution to the problem of Pain in existence in the most fundamental, general, rock bottom way such that there is no more fundamental, general, or rock bottom way to state them. ... which is why very careful attention should be paid by translators to the translation of the term 'dukkha'. 'Stress' and 'Anguish' for example, are not all-encompassing of terms of pain and suffering. The term needs to encompass all those features that define 'dukkha' in the various places it is defined (for example, SN 5.55.13 and 14, above, and the Satipatthana Sutta.) There are really only two words in English of such scope: the literal 'shit' (do-do uk ukky k-kha), and 'pain'. And the clincher, for 'pain' is the fact that in the definition found throught the suttas of dukkha as: aging and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery, and despair, ('pain and misery' being the contrast between physical pain and mental pain,) the word which I have translated as 'pain,' that 'physical pain,' is 'dukkha'. Dukkha needs to stand for physical pain and mental pain in the same way as does 'pain' in English.
There is another aspect to this. Middle-class American businesmen suffer 'stress'; upperclass English women suffer 'anguish'. Other strata of society will reject out of hand that they suffer either stress or anguish. Virtually nobody in their right mind will reject the fact that they suffer pain. The compassionate term therefore, considering mankind in general, is the term accepted most universally: pain. If the translator feels the need to take in higher orders of existence, such as the gods, he will consider the term 'shit' to be more universally understood. 'Pain' is really an abstract term; there is no concrete thing to point to to explain it that will imply both mental and physical pain. I yield for the most part in my translations to the sensibilities of the modern reader of English and use 'pain' for my translation of 'dukkha', but the literal meaning should be kept in mind when you come across the devas or face rebirth. Of course the even simpler way to handle this is to leave the term untranslated and add it to the English vocabulary. "Dukkha happens."

PTS: Bearing in Mind (b), V.363
WP: Remembrance 2, II.1848

[17] Avijjā Suttaŋ V.429

Questioned about the meaning of the term 'avijja', 'blindness', the Buddha explains that it is blindness to the truth of the four truths.
Avijjā is translated as 'ignorance' by Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi and almost all the other translators, but, unless you hear in this term 'Ignore -ance' understanding it to mean not that one is ignorant of a thing but that one is ignoring (refusing to acknowledge) one's knowledge of it, 'ignorance' is not the idea here. The idea here is precisely ignoring: 'not seeing' having penetrating knowledge and vision of, ('vijja' = 'vision'); understanding, seeing it as it really is, and not heeding one's vision.
If this were not the case anyone having once heard the four truths could be said to be without ignorance.
Make the connection: This is the first factor in the Paticca Samuppada, the one ultimately dependent upon which is 'own-making' or constructing one's own personal world. So when that formula is encountered, it should be understood to be saying: "It is because of blindness to the four truths that one constructs one's own world."
The stream-enterer has knowledge and vision of the four truths and is therefore not ignorant, but for some time he may still go on constructing his own world. He does so out of blindness to, the ignoring of, the truth that whatsoever he constructs ends in pain.

PTS: Ignorance, V.364
WP: Ignorance, II.1850

[18] Vijjā Suttaŋ, V.429

Questioned about the meaning of the term 'vijja', 'vision', the Buddha explains that it is vision of the truth of the four truths.
The seeing before your very eyes, at any instance of impulse to create for one's self the certain knowledge that it will end in pain.
Bhk. Bodhi's 'True knowledge' is a gloss and apparently an attempt to overcome the defects of translating 'avijja' as 'ignorance.'

PTS: Knowledge, V.364
WP: True Knowledge, II.1851

[19] Sankāsanā Suttaŋ, V.430

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that each of the four truths is capable of unlimited ways of being exprssed. See also the Discussion of this sutta.

PTS: Illustration, V.364
WP: Implications, II.1851
Discussion

[20] Tatha (Tathaa, Tathā), V.430

The Buddha states categorically that the Four Truths are true, unalterable.

PTS: True, V.365
WP: Actual, II.1851
ATI: Real, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Suchas Such Are Such as Such Are

III. Kotigāma Vagga, V.431

[21] Paţhama Vijjā Suttaŋ V.431

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is because of not having knowledge of, not penetrating the four truths that beings have been wandering round this round-and-round so very very long.

PTS: Knowledge (a), V.365
WP: Kotigama (1), II.1852

[22] Dutiya Vijjā Suttaŋ V.432

The Buddha warns the bhikkhus that those shaman and brahmin who do not understand the four truths have not found the way to Arahantship.

PTS: Knowledge (b), V.366
WP: Koţigāma (2), II.1853

[23] Sammā Sambuddho Suttaŋ, V.433

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is because of understanding the four truths that he is called The Arahant, The Consummately Self-Awakened One.

PTS: Fully Enlightened, V.367
WP: The Perfectly Enlightened One, II.1854

[24] Arahanta Suttaŋ, V.433

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that whoever has in the past, or will in the future or is now an Arahant all became such as a consequence of understanding the Four Aristocratic Truths.

PTS: Arahants, V.367
WP: Arahants, II.1854

[25] Āsavakkhayo Suttaŋ, V.434

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is one who knows and sees the Four Aristocratic Truths that is able to destroy the corrupting influences, not one who does not know and see.

PTS: Distruction of the Āsavas, V.367
WP: The Destruction of the Taints, II.1855

[26] Mittā Suttaŋ, V.434

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that they should teach The Four Aristocratic Truths to their friends, kith and kin, for whom they feel kindness of heart, who have a mind to listen to them.

PTS: Friends, V.368
WP: Friends, II.1855

[27] Tathā Suttaŋ, V.435

The Buddha aserts that the Four Aristocratic Truths are called that because they are true.

PTS: True, V.368
WP: Actual, II.1855
BD: Such-as-Such-is, Olds, trans.

[28] Loka Suttaŋ, V.435

The Buddha explains that among the gods, the World, including Mara and Brahma, with shamen and brahmins being born among gods and men, one who gets the getting (the 'tathagata', 'the such-as-such-is-getter') is considered the Aristocrat and that is why the Four Aristocratic Truths are called 'Aristocratic Truths'.

PTS: The World, V.368
WP: The World, II.1856
BD: In the World, Olds, trans.

[29] Pariññeyyaŋ or Abhiññeyya Suttaŋ, V.436

To become an Arahant there is one thing to be comprehended, one thing to be let go, one thing to be seen as true, and one thing to be made to become.

PTS: To be Fully Understood or Comprehended, V.
WP: To Be Fully Understood, II.1856

[30] Gavampati Suttaŋ, V.436

Gavampati states to a group of elder bhikkhus that he has heard face-to-face with the Buddha that he who sees any one of the Four Truths also sees all of them. See also the Discussion.

PTS: Gavampati, V.369
WP: Gavampati, II.1857
Discussion

IV. Siŋsapāvana Vagga V.437

[31] Siŋsapā Suttaŋ, V.437

The Buddha compares what he has seen to what he has taught to a handfull of leaves in comparison to the leaves in the surrounding grove.
The lesson is to learn to distinguish in one's speech between what is beneficial in the attainment of the goal and what is not.

PTS: Siŋsapā, V.370
WP: The Siŋsapā Grove, II.1857
ATI: The Siŋsapā Leaves

[32] Khadira Suttaŋ, V.438

The Buddha gives the bhikkhus a simile for the impossibility of attaining the end of pain without mastering the Four Aristocratic Truths.

PTS: The Acacia Tree, V.371
WP: Acacia, II.1858

[33] Daņđa Suttaŋ, V.439

In the same way that a stick, when it falls, falls sometimes on it's tip end, sometimes on it's butt end, sometimes flat, in the same way beings obstructed by blindness, yoked to rebirth by desire, fall from here and land there, fall from there and land here.

PTS: The Stick, V.371
WP: Stick, II.1859

[34] Ceļa Suttaŋ, V.440

The Buddha states that the urgency with which one would deal with one's wrap or turban being on fire is insignificant compared with the urgency with which one should deal with comprhension of the Four Truths for the ending of Pain.

PTS: Turban, V.372
WP: Clothes, II.1859

[35] Sattisata Suttaŋ, V.440

The Buddha aserts that even if a man were to be pierced with 300 spears every day for a hundred years, it would be worth it to endure it, to even consider it a pleasure, were it to happen that at the end of that hundred years one were to awaken to the Four Aristocratic Truths.
How come?
Because there is no seen beginning to this business of living. In other words, compared to what has gone before, 100 years of such torture is but a finger-snap, the release from it a pleasure beyond calculation.
Sattisata. 'spears-a-hundred', but more aptly: 'spears-a-plenty', 'spears pleny'nuf' since it is one-hundred spear-cuts 3 times a day for a hundred years. Sata is understood in the sense of 'plenty' as well as '100'.

PTS: A Hundred Years, V.372
WP: A Hundred Spears, II.1860
ATI: One Hundred Spears, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[36] Pāņā Suttaŋ, V.441

The Buddha provides a simile for the vast scope of the degeneration that has come about in living beings in just the sea in this world.

PTS: Living Creatures, V.373
WP: Creatures, II.1860
ATI: Animals, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[37] Paţhama Suriyupamā Suttaŋ, V.442

In the same way as the dawn is the first sign of the sunrise, so the first sign of comprehension of the Four Aristocratic Truths is Consummate View.
Since Consummate View, 'sammā ditthi' is defined as the Four Aristocratic Truths, it must serve as both the starting point in the adoption of the Magga and a description of the 'view' at it's conclusion. The best way to understand this so as to avoid the idea that it must be taken on faith is to understand it as a working hypothesis. In fact, 'ditthi' is 'seeing,' but seeing intellectually, seeing a thing as it really is is 'dittha'.

PTS: The Parable of the Sun (a), V.373
WP: The Sun (1), II.1861

[38] Dutiya Suriyupamā Suttaŋ, V.442

The Buddha compares the arising of a Buddha and the teaching of the Four Truths to the way the sun dispells darkness.

PTS: The Parable of the Sun (b), V.374
WP: The Sun (2), II.1861

[39] Indakhīlo Suttaŋ, V.443

The Buddha describes how one who understands the Four Aristocratic Truths does not rely on outward appearances for determining whether some person is one who knows and sees.
Be not mislead by 'the guru smile' and 'the guru radiance'. This appearance of great happiness is based on the love of fame and fortune. Watch, in stead for signs of lust, anger and blindness; knowledge of pain, it's source, the way it is brought to an end, and the walk to walk to bring about it's end. A teacher can project great power while having faulty understanding from a motive of anger at the world and seeing the Dhamma as a weapon against it.

PTS: Foundation Stone, V.375
WP: Indra's Pillar, II.1862

[40] Vādino Suttaŋ, V.445

Vādin. 'Professor'. In the old tradition of one who wanders around seeking truth by way of debating anyone who claimed to possess such. This is a lost art in most places in the world today [Saturday, November 07, 2015 8:08 AM] and that is a shame. This sort of debate used to exist even in this country. It was known as 'wrestling with the devil'. Among orthodox Jews such debate existed until very recently and may still exist. The debates often reached white heat and sometimes came to blows, but always ended with the understanding that the effort at bottom was to find the truth. The debate was separate from fellow-feeling. We are much at a disadvantage for the loss of this art. In our so-called 'forums' there is such fear of upsetting people's feelings (and thereby losing viewers and fame) that anything approaching true debate is cut off at the knees. What needs to be understood is that as long as debate is conducted according to rules that will always lead to higher understanding, upset feelings are the consequence of hanging on to wrong ideas. Nothing personal. Let them go and be happy.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

The Buddha compares the efforts of a professor to upset the balance of one who understands the Four Aristocratic Truths to the impotence of the wind to shake a fourty-eight-foot piller sunk twenty-four feet into the ground.

PTS: Dogmatists, V.376
WP: Seeking an Argument, II.1863

V. Papāta Vagga, V.446

[41] Cintā Suttaŋ V.446

This sutta deals with the thoughts one should and should not dwell on. It should be read when the issue of what the Buddha did not discuss comes up (see Discussion of DN 29)), because here by the juxtaposition of the issues not to be considered with those which should be thought about it is clear that this is not a matter of keeping things a mystery but of what is and what is not a matter pertaining to the goal.

PTS: Reasoning, V.377
WP: Reflection about the World, II.1864

[42] Papāta Suttaŋ, V.448

In this sutta a bhikkhu comes across a frightening precipice and asks the Buddha if he has ever seen the like. The Buddha tells him that the precipice of old age and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair that results from own-making the own-made is a more frightening precipice than that.

PTS: The Precipice, V.378
WP: The Precipice, II.1865
ATI: The Drop-off, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[43] Pariļāha Suttaŋ, V.450

In this sutta the Buddha Describes the Great Burning Hell and a bhikkhu asks him if there is any worse burning. The Buddha tells him that the burning of old age and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair that results from own-making the own-made is a worse burning than that.

PTS: Distress, V.379
WP: The Great Conflagration, II.1867

[44] Kūţāgara Suttaŋ, V.452

The Buddha compares the claim of a person who claims to be able to bring pain to an end without the Four Aristocratic Truths to a person who claimed to be able to build a house with a peaked roof from the peak down.

PTS: The Peaked House, V.380
WP: Peaked House, II.1868
ATI: Gabled, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[45] Chiggaļa Suttaŋ, V.453

Ananda reports an astounding archery trick, but the Buddha tells him of a trick which is much more difficult.
Chiggaļa. [O.E.: cipplan, to cut, E. chip] a slit, something with a hole chipped out; PED: Keyhole.
The horse-hair is split lengthwise one hundred times ... anyone could pierce a hair only split seven times! For more archery tricks see Jātaka 522.

PTS: The Keyhole, V.381
WP: The Hair, II.1869
ATI: The Horsehair, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[46] Andhakāra Suttaŋ, V.454

The Buddha conjures an image of the impenetrable darkness of the space between the worlds and then tells the bhikkhus that darker than this is the blindness of one who does not see the Four Aristocratic Truths.
Woodward has this darkness as 'the darkness of interstellar space; Bhk. Bodhi calles them 'world interstices'. What is being referred to here is not the darkness of outer space (neither between planatary and steller bodies nor beteeen galaxies which are all within a single 'world system', but the darkness between world systems.

PTS: Gross Darkness, V.382
WP: Darkness, II.1870
ATI: Darkness, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[47] Dutiya Chiggaļa Suttaŋ, V.455

The well-known sutta wherein the Buddha describes the difficulty of attaining birth as man for one who has slipped into lower births as being as infrequent as a blind sea turtle poking it's head up through a one-holed yoke that has been cast upon the ocean. Visualize the blind sea-turtle and the yoke with one hole. Allow your mind to free-associate. See the symbolism.

PTS: Yoke-hole (a), V.383
WP: Yoke with a Hole, (1) II.1871

[48] Tatiya Chiggaļa Suttaŋ, V.456

A version of the well-known sutta wherein the Buddha describes the difficulty of attaining birth as man for one who has slipped into lower births as being as infrequent as a blind sea turtle poking it's head up through a one-holed yoke that has been cast upon the ocean.

PTS: Yoke-hole (b), V.384
WP: Yoke with a Hole (2), II.1872
ATI: The Hole

[49] Paţhama Sineru Suttaŋ, V.457

Streamwinner compared to what has gone before is like comparing seven bits of gravel to Mount Sineru.

PTS: Sineru (a), V.384
WP: Sineru (1), II.1872

[50] Dutiya Sineru Suttaŋ, V.458

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that the amount of Pain that has been destroyed by a Streamwinner compared to what is left is like comparing seven bits of gravel to Mount Sineru.

PTS: Sineru (b), V.385
WP: Sineru (2), II.1873

VI. Abhisamaya Vagga, V.459

[51] Nakhasikha Suttaŋ, V.459

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: a bit of dirt on the fingernail compared to the whole earth.

PTS: Tip of the Nail, V.386
WP: The Fingernail, II.1874

[52] Pokkharaņī Suttaŋ, V.460

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: a drop of water on the tip of a blade of grass compared to the water in a gigantic water tank.

PTS: The Tank, V.386
WP: The Pond, II.1874

[53] Paţhama Sambejja Suttaŋ, V.460

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: two or three drops of water compared to the water at the confluence of India's five great rivers.

PTS: Confluence (a), V.387
WP: Water at the Confluence, II.1875

[54] Dutiya Sambejja Suttaŋ, V.461

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: the drying up of the water at the confluence of India's five great rivers vs two or three drops that remain.
It is curious that the number of drops here and in the previous sutta is two or three versus seven. In all the suttas of this chapter the Pali is abridged indicating the text used in the first is to be used, but it may be possible that this was originally a simile for the clan-to-clan goer, or it may even indicate that the number seven so firmly associated with the stream-enterer is not to be held onto to rigidly.

PTS: Confluence (b), V.387
WP: Water at the Confluence 2, II.1875

[55] Paţhama Pathavī Suttaŋ, V.462

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: seven small balls of clay compared to the whole earth.

PTS: The Earth (a), V.388
WP: The Earth, II.1876

[56] Dutiya Pathavī Suttaŋ, V.462

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: the wearing away of the whole earth versus seven balls of clay that remain.

PTS: The Earth (b), V.388
WP: The Earth 2, II.1876

[57] Paţhama Samudda Suttaŋ, V.463

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: Two or three drops of water compared to the water in the ocean.

PTS: The Ocean (a), V.389
WP: The Ocean, II.1876

[58] Dutiya Samudda Suttaŋ, V.463

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: The drying up of the ocean versus two or three drops that remain.

PTS: The Ocean (b), V.389
WP: The Ocean 2, II.1877

[59] Paţhama Pabbatupamā Suttaŋ, V.464

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: seven balls of clay as large as mustard seeds compared to the Himalaya.

PTS: Simile of the Mountain (a), V.389
WP: The Mountain, II.1877

[60] Dutiya Pabbatupamā Suttaŋ, V.464

A simile for the great accomplishment of the Streamwinner: the wearing away of Himalaya compared to seven grains of gravel the size of mustard seeds that remain.
Compare the previous two suttas with the last two of the previous chapter [SN 5.56.49, SN 5.56.50] and then compare them with the suttas at SN 2.13. Just to keep you on your toes! We also get a hint as to the relative sizes of Mt. Sineru, the Hemalayas, and the Earth.

PTS: Simile of the Mountain (b), V.389
WP: The Mountain 2, II.1877

VII. V.465

Covering suttas 61-70. Ten suttas all with the same introductory simile illustrating a comparison between smaller and larger. born among men: born elsewhere; born in central India: born elsewhere; having wisdom: not having wisdom; abstaining from alcohol: not abstaining; born on land: born in water; reverant towards mother ... : not reverant towards mother ... father ... shamen ... brahmins ... elders.

[61] Aññatra Suttaŋ, V.465

PTS: Other Than, V.390
WP: Elsewhere, II.1878

[62] Paccanta Suttaŋ, V.466

PTS: Outlying, V.391
WP: Outlying Countries, II.1879

[63] Paññā Suttaŋ, V.467

PTS: Insight, V.391
WP: Wisdom, II.1879

[64] Surāmeraya Suttaŋ, V.467

PTS: Intoxicating Liquor, V.391
WP: Wines and Liquors, II.1879

[65] Odakā Suttaŋ, V.467

PTS: Water-born, V.392
WP: Water-Born, II.1879

[66] Matteyyā Suttaŋ, V.467

PTS: Reverent to Mothers, V.392
WP: Who Honour Mother, II.1879

[67] Petteyyā Suttaŋ, V.467

PTS: Reverent to Fathers, V.392
WP: Who Honour Father, II.1880

[68] Sāmañña Suttaŋ, V.468

PTS: Reverent to Recluses, V.392
WP: Who Honour Ascetics, II.1880

[69] Brahmañña Suttaŋ, V.468

PTS: Reverent to Brahmins, V.392
WP: Who Honour Brahmins, II.1880

[70] Pacāyika Suttaŋ, V.468

PTS: Respect to Elders, V.392
WP: Who Respect Elders, II.1880

VIII. Appakā-Virata Vagga, V.468

Covering suttas 71-80. Ten suttas all with the same introductory simile illustrating a comparison between smaller and larger. life-takers: abstainers from taking life; takers of what is not given; indulgence in sensual pleasures; false speakers; slanderers; harsh speakers; idle babblers; seed and vegetable life destroyers; those who eat after noon; those who wear perfumes and cosmetics.

[71] Pāņa Suttaŋ V.468

PTS: Life, V.393
WP: Killing Living Beings, II.1880

[72] Adinna Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Not Given, V.393
WP: Taking What Is Not Given, II.1880

[73] Kāmesu Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Sensual Lust, V.393
WP: Sexual Misconduct, II.1881

[74] Musāvāda Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Falsehood, V.393
WP: False Speech, II.1881

[75] Pesuņa Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Slander, V.393
WP: Divisive Speech, II.1881

[76] Pharusa Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Harsh Speech, V.393
WP: Harsh Speech, II.1881

[77] Samphappalāpa Suttaŋ V.469

PTS: Idle Chatter, V.393
WP: Idle Chatter, II.1881

[78] Bija Suttaŋ V.470

PTS: Seed, V.394
WP: Seed Life, II.1881

[79] Vikāle Suttaŋ V.470

PTS: Unseasonable, V.394
WP: Improper Times, II.1881

[80] Gandhavilepana Suttaŋ V.470

PTS: Scents and Unguents, V.394
WP: Scents and Unguents, II.1882

IX. Āmakadhañña-Peyyālam V.470

Covering suttas 81-90. Ten suttas all with the same introductory simile illustrating a comparison between smaller and larger. those who view entertainments: those who abstain; those who accept gold and silver; uncooked rice; uncooked meat; women and girls; slaves; goats and sheep; fowles and swine; elephants.

[81] Nacca Suttaŋ, V.470

PTS: Nautch, V.394
WP: Dancing and Singing, II.1882

[82] Sayaņa Suttaŋ, V.471

PTS: Bed, V.394
WP: High Beds, II.1882

[83] Rajata Suttaŋ, V.471

PTS: Silver, V.394
WP: Gold and Silver, II.1882

[84] Dhañña Suttaŋ, V.471

PTS: Uncooked Grain, V.395
WP: Raw Grain, II.1882

[85] Maŋsa Suttaŋ, V.471

PTS: Uncooked Flesh, V.395
WP: Raw Meat, II.1882

[86] Kumāriya Suttaŋ, V.471

PTS: Girls, V.395
WP: Girls, II.1883

[87] Dāsī Suttaŋ, V.472

PTS: Female and Male Slaves, V.395
WP: Slaves, II.1883

[88] Ajelaka Suttaŋ, V.472

PTS: Goats and Sheep, V.395
WP: Goats and Sheep, II.1883

[89] Kukkuţasūkara Suttaŋ, V.472

PTS: Fowls and Swine, V.395
WP: Fowl and Swine, II.1883

[90] Hatthina Suttaŋ, V.472

PTS: Elephants, V.395
WP: Elephants, II.1883

X. Bahutarā V.473

Covering suttas 91-101. Eleven suttas all with the same introductory simile illustrating a comparison between smaller and larger: more numerous those who accept land: those who abstain; refrain from buying and selling; refrain from running errands; refrain from using false measures; refrain from bribery; refrain from cutting, flogging, binding, highway robbery, plunder; violent deeds.

[91] Khetta Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Fields, V.395
WP: Fields, II.1883

[92] Kayavikkaya Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Buying and Selling, V.395
WP: Buying and Selling, II.1884

[93] Dūteyya Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Errands, V.395
WP: Messages, II.1884

[94] Tulākūţa Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Giving False Measure, V.396
WP: False Weights, II.1884

[95] Ukkoţana Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Perverting Justice, V.396
WP: Bribery, II.1884

[96] Chedana Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Cutting, V.396
WP: Mutilating, etc., II.1884

[97] Vadha Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Flogging, V.396

[98] Bandhana Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Binding, V.396

[99] Viparāmosa Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Highway Robbery, V.396

[100] Ālopa Suttaŋ, V.473

PTS: Plundering, V.396

[101] Sāhasākārā Suttaŋ V.473

PTS: Violent Deeds, V.396

XI. Gatiyo V.474

Covering suttas 102-131. Eleven suttas all with the same introductory simile illustrating a comparison between smaller and larger: more numerous those who accept land: those who abstain; refrain from buying and selling; refrain from running errands; refrain from using false measures; refrain from bribery; refrain from cutting, flogging, binding, highway robbery, plunder; violent deeds.

[102] Pañcagati: Paţhama Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.474

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (1), V.397
WP: Passing Away as Humans, II.1885
ATI: 102 Dust, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Quitting Humankind

[103] Pañcagati: Dutiya Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.474

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (2), V.397
WP: Passing Away as Humans 2, II.1885
ATI: 103-104 Dust, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Quitting Humankind 2

[104] Pañcagati: Tatiya Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (3), V.397
WP: Passing away as Humans 3, II.1885
BD: Quitting Humankind 3

[105] Pañcagati: Catuttha Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (4), V.397
WP: Passing away as Humans 4, II.1885
ATI: 105-107 Dust, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Quitting Humankind 4

[106] Pañcagati: Pañcama Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (5), V.397
WP: Passing away as Humans 5, II.1885
BD: Quitting Humankind 5

[107] Pañcagati: Chaţţha Manussacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Humans (6), V.397
WP: Passing away as Humans 6, II.1885
BD: Quitting Humankind 6

[108] Pañcagati: Paţhama Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (1), V.397
WP: Passing away as Devas 1-3, II.1886
ATI: 108-110 Dust, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 1

[109] Pañcagati: Dutiya Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (2), V.397
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 2

[110] Pañcagati: Tatiya Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (3), V.397
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 3

[111] Pañcagati: Catuttha Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (4), V.397
WP: Passing Away as Devas 4-6, II.1886
ATI: 111-113 Dust, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 4

[112] Pañcagati: Pañcama Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (5), V.397
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 5

[113] Pañcagati: Chaţţha Devacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Devas (6), V.397
BD: Quitting the Godly Realms 6

[114] Pañcagati: Paţhama Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (1), V.397
WP: Passing Away from Hell 1-3, II.1886
BD: Quitting Hell 1

[115] Pañcagati: Dutiya Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (2), V.397
BD: Quitting Hell 2

[116] Pañcagati: Tatiya Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (3), V.397
BD: Quitting Hell 3

[117] Pañcagati: Catuttha Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (4), V.397
WP: Passing Away from Hell 4-6, II.1886
BD: Quitting Hell 4

[118] Pañcagati: Pañcama Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (5), V.397
BD: Quitting Hell 5

[119] Pañcagati: Chaţţha Nirayacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from Purgatory (6), V.397
BD: Quitting Hell 6

[120] Pañcagati: Paţhama Tiracchāna Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (1), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Animal Realm 1-3, II.1887
BD: Quitting Animal Life 1

[121] Pañcagati: Dutiya Tiracchānacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (2), V.397
BD: Quitting Animal Life 2

[122] Pañcagati: Tatiya vcuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (3), V.397
BD: Quitting Animal Life 3

[123] Pañcagati: Catuttha Tiracchānacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (4), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Animal Realm 4-6, II.1887
BD: Quitting Animal Life 4

[124] Pañcagati: Pañcama Tiracchānacuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (5), V.397
BD: Quitting Animal Life 5

[125] Pañcagati: Chaţţha vcuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing as Animals (6), V.397
BD: Quitting Animal Life 6

[126] Pañcagati: Paţhama Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (1), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Domain of Ghosts 1-3, II.1887
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 1

[127] Pañcagati: Dutiya Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (2), V.397
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 2

[128] Pañcagati: Tatiya Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (3), V.397
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 3

[129] Pañcagati: Catuttha Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (4), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Domain of Ghosts 4, II.1887
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 4

[130] Pañcagati: Pañcama Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (5), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Domain of Ghosts 5, II.1887
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 5

[131] Pañcagati: Chaţţha Petticuti Suttaŋ, V.475

PTS: Deceasing from the Realm of Ghosts (6), V.397
WP: Passing Away from the Domain of Ghosts 6, II.1887
BD: Quitting the Ghostly Garb 6


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


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