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Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: MahāVagga
53. Jhāna Saŋyuttam
II. Appamāda Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
V: The Great Chapter
53: Kindred Sayings on the Four Trances
Chapter II: Earnestness

Suttas 13-22

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

Sutta 13

Tathāgata

[13.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all creatures,
whether footless or having two,
four,
or many feet;
whether having forms or formless;
whether conscious or unconscious,
or neither conscious nor unconscious, —
of these the Tathāgata,
the Arahant,
the fully Enlightened One,
is reckoned chief; —
even so, monks,
of all profitable conditions which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 14

The Foot

[14.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all the foot-characteristics
of such creatures as roam about
are joined together in the foot of the elephant,
and as the elephant's foot
in size
is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 15

The Roof-peak

[15.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, in a peaked house
all the rafters whatsoever
go together to the roof-peak,
slope to the roof-peak,
are joined together in the roof-peak,
and of them
the peak is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 16

Wood

[16.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all scented woods whatsoever
the dark sandal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 17

Heart-wood

[17.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all scented heart-woods whatsoever
the red saldal-wood is reckoned chief, —
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 18

Jasmine

[18.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all scented flowers whatsoever
the jasmine is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 19

Prince

[19.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, all petty princes whatsoever
follow in the train of the universal monarch,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 20

Moon

[20.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all starry bodies whatsoever
the radiance does not equal one-sixteenth part
of the radiance of the moon;
just as the moon is reckoned chief of them,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 21

Sun

[53.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, in the autumn season,
when the sky is opened up
and cleared of clouds,
the sun,
leaping up into the firmament,
drives away all darkness,
and shines
and burns
and flashes forth,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.

 


 

Sutta 22

Cloth

[22.1] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks,
saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Just as, monks, of all woven cloths whatsoever
the cloth of Benares is reckoned chief,
even so, monks, of all profitable conditions,
which are rooted in earnestness,
which join together in earnestness, —
of those conditions
earnestness is reckoned chief.

Of the earnest monk
it may be expected
that he will cultivate,
that he will make much of
the four trances.

And how, monks,
does a monk who is earnest
cultivate
and make much of
the four trances?

Herein a monk, aloof from sensuality,
aloof from evil states,
enters on the first trance
which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained,
born of solitude,
zestful and easeful,
and abides therein.

Then, by the calming down of thought directed and sustained,
he enters on that inward calm,
that one-pointedness of mind,
apart from thought directed and sustained,
that is born of mental balance,
zestful and easeful,
which is the second trance,
and abides therein.

Then, by the fading out of zest,
he abides indifferent,
mindful and composed,
and experiences ease through the body.

Having entered on the third trance,
which the Ariyans describe in these terms:

'He who is indifferent and mindful dwells happily,' -
he abides therein.

Then, by the abandoning of ease,
by the abandoning of discomfort,
by the ending of the happiness and unhappiness that he had before,
entering on that state which is neither pleasant nor painful,
that utter purity of mindfulness reached by indifference,
which is the fourth trance,
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, a monk who is earnest
cultivates
and makes much of
the four trances.


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